Play it Safe on the Poudre – News Release

By | News | No Comments

CLICK HERE FOR OUR RIVER ACCESS AND SAFETY INFORMATION BROCHURE

Partner agencies join forces to provide Poudre River safety education

As temperatures and the Cache la Poudre River’s waters rise, people should be extremely cautious when recreating near and in the river.

A new river-safety initiative, “Play it Safe on the Poudre,” emphasizes this point through newly installed safety and educational signage along the river, public outreach and other means. The intent is to minimize future Poudre River-related injuries and deaths.

In the days after two river deaths in summer 2017, representatives from multiple agencies came together with an impassioned drive to empower people to recreate as safely as possible near the Poudre River. The “Play it Safe” initiative was born. It’s important to note that river-safety work has gone on in our community in past years.

“The Poudre River is a source of local pride that draws thousands to its waters each year. We wouldn’t dissuade peoples’ love for it and what it represents. But the river is equal parts beautiful and destructive. Its power is easy to underestimate, and river-related tragedy can befall anyone at any time,” PFA spokeswoman Madeline Noblett said.

“Ultimately, as an emergency service agency, it’s Poudre Fire Authority’s duty to do what we can to reduce risk in our community related to any element, fire or water. And we couldn’t do that without the support of our committed partners.”

Representatives who have taken part in the group’s efforts represent: Poudre Fire Authority; multiple departments within the City of Fort Collins, including the city’s Natural Areas Department; Poudre Heritage Alliance for the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area; Larimer County; the Larimer County Sheriff’s Office and Larimer County Emergency Services; Colorado Parks and Wildlife; and more.

The Poudre River presents numerous hazards. Broken or low-hanging tree branches, hidden beneath the water, can snag a person out for a lazy afternoon tubing trip. Freezing waters made cold by spring runoff can cause a person to react slowly, when quicker action is needed, or possibly suffer hypothermia. And deceptively fast- moving waters pose a drowning risk to even the most experienced swimmers.

On June 27, 2017, 64-year-old William McHarg, of Severance, died after falling into the Poudre while he was on a rafting trip. The Larimer County Coroner’s Office determined Mr. McHarg had severe heart disease and died from a heart attack and drowning. Seattle-area 18-year-old Maximilian Gonzalez died after getting caught on June 18 in a low-head dam while tubing near Bellvue.

“Our hearts go out to everyone affected by these devastating events; they’ve faced unimaginable loss,” Noblett said. “We also want our community to know that we can work together to minimize these tragedies. The keys are education, awareness, which lead to changes in behavior. This is the crux of community risk reduction – the heart and soul of the work to which we commit ourselves.”

“Play it Safe” is an ongoing and multi-faceted initiative. PFA and partner agencies are paying for various components of the project, which includes but isn’t limited to:

–     Installation of warning signs to alert people of the presence of low-head dams ahead. There are numerous low-head dams on the Cache la Poudre River, throughout Larimer County. These structures are installed to slow water to enable diversion of water into ditches. However, the physical drop structure can create dangerous situations for boaters because of their recirculating currents and large hydraulic forces. Though they appear to be smooth and easily traversed in a tube, raft or kayak, they can easily injure and trap people and water vessels. The hope is that people on the river will see the signs and have enough time to get out of the river before they get to the low-head dams.

Safety signs stand beside the Poudre River, near the Bellvue Watson Fish Hatchery, warning people of the low-head dams downstream that pose a significant risk. They were installed in 2018, as part of the “Play it Safe on the Poudre” river-safety

– Installation of signs with river-safety information and maps, including recommendations that people wear river-rated personal floatation devices (PFDs) any time they are near the river; what to do in the event of a river-related emergency; and more.

Educational river-safety signage, designed and installed by the City of Fort Collins, sits near a trail by the Poudre River, accessible in the approximate area of 1219 N. Shields St.

COMING PUBLIC EVENTS RELATED TO WATER SAFETY

Poudre  Riverfest

Noon to 6 p.m., June 2

Location: Adjacent to New Belgium Brewery, 500 Linden St., Fort Collins, on the Poudre River Oxbow River-safety talk/demonstration with PFA firefighters scheduled for 4 p.m.

More info: www.poudreriverfest.org

 

Big Splash

10 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 9

Location: 1883 Water Works Big Splash, 2005 N. Overland Trail, Fort Collins

Learn about the “Play it Safe” initiative from the Poudre Heritage Alliance

 

Day of Giving July 11

HuHot Mongolian Grill, 249 S. College Ave., Fort Collins

HuHot will donate 20% of the day’s proceeds to support Larimer County Dive Rescue Team. The money will be used to purchase new rescue equipment for the team.

 

Outreach at New Belgium July 14

Poudre Heritage Alliance will host a booth on New Belgium Brewery’s lawn to educate the public about and raise funds for the “Play it Safe on the Poudre” initiative.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Amy Gonzalez is the mother of Maximilian Gonzalez, an 18-year-old who died in 2017 in a tubing accident. He and his cousin were caught in a low-head dam, near the Bellvue Watson Fish Hatchery. Max later died from his injuries; his cousin survived. Amy wants to make sure that no family has to endure what hers has. She wants people to know Max’s story, and be aware of low-head dams and the risks the river poses. She will be available for interviews from 1:30 to 3 p.m. June 2 at the Poudre Riverfest. She will be at the booths represented by Poudre Fire Authority, the City of Fort Collins Natural Areas, and the Poudre Heritage Alliance. Those who would like to set up a time for interviews may contact PFA Public Affairs and Communication Manager Madeline Noblett (contact info below) ahead of the event. She will not be available for interviews before the event.

Through the nonprofit Poudre Heritage Alliance for the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area, people can donate to support these and future river-safety-focused efforts. Go to www.coloradogives.org/playitsafeonthepoudre for more information about how to donate. Any questions related to donations may be directed to: Poudre Heritage Alliance at 970-295-4851 or playitsafe@poudreheritage.org.

MEDIA CONTACTS

Madeline Noblett, Poudre Fire Authority public affairs and communication manager mnoblett@poudre-fire.org or 970-219-5930

Zoe Shark, City of Fort Collins Natural Areas Department community relations manager zshark@fcgov.com or 970-221-6311

Kathleen Benedict, Poudre Heritage Alliance executive director kbenedict@poudreheritage.org or 970-295-4851

POUDRE FIRE AUTHORITY RIVER-RESCUE DATA

PFA crews were involved with 23 actual rescues (related to the Poudre River or in a canal in PFA’s 235-square- mile service area) between 2013 to 2017. Specifically, this means PFA crews actively responded to an emergency incident, deploying personnel and, in some cases, water craft to rescue people. In some cases, PFA responded but did not perform a rescue because the person self-rescued, or a bystander or other agency rescued the person or people.

The first rescue of the 2018 season occurred May 16, when PFA firefighters were dispatched to the bridge in the area of 430 N. College Ave. about 3:26 p.m. A man was stranded on a rock in the river; bystanders reported he had been tubing. Firefighters secured a safety line and launched the rescue boat. The man was safely removed from the river at about 4:50 p.m. He was checked by paramedics on-scene and released. PFA was assisted by partners from Larimer County Sheriff’s Office Emergency Services, UCHealth EMS, Larimer County Dive Rescue, City of Fort Collins Natural Areas Rangers, and Fort Collins Police Services.

SAFETY TIPS

  • Tell someone where you are going and always go with a partner, when you expect to return and where and who to call if you don’t. If your plans change while you are traveling, put a note in your car on the driver’s side dashboard with the new
  • Have a communication plan in the event of an emergency, not all areas west of Ted’s place have cell service.
  • Wear life jackets around Some areas near the water’s edge and some riverbanks are unstable due to current high-flow rates.
  • Stay away from riverbanks during times of high-flowing The banks may have become unstable and give way underneath you.
  • Never forget the power of the river, especially when it is running high and fast from spring runoff or recent heavy
  • Be aware of the limitations of yourself in the water. Even if you are a good swimmer, fast moving water and under currents can easily catch you off guard. Additionally there are often rocks or other obstacles underneath the water that can knock you off balance even in shallow water
  • Watch your surroundings, including the weather. Be prepared for extremes in the weather, especially if more rain is predicted. Heavy rains upstream can alter the water flow and depth in a short period of time and also contribute to When your clothes are soaking wet, hypothermia is a danger even in the summer.
  • Carry a First Aid kit and know how to use it. Take a first aid course for CPR and basic medical
  • If caught in a fast flowing river, rapids or storm water, try to float feet first in a half sit
  • Remember: Reach or Throw, Don’t Go. If someone is caught in fast moving water, reach out to them or throw a rope to the person in the water. Don’t go into the water yourself or you may also become in need of rescuing. Call 911 ASAP with as detailed location to where the incident is

If your plans include wanting to be on the river in a recreational watercraft, we urge you to use one of the many qualified local rafting companies for the best experience. They have qualified instructors, safety equipment and trained staff in case of medical emergencies. Additionally, if you are in your own recreational watercraft and it gets away from you, please call our non-emergency Dispatch number at 970-221-6540 to report the watercraft, when it is safe to do so. Have the color, approximate size and the location you last saw it and direction it was traveling so that we are aware of it and can let other concerned citizens who call in and see it know that there is no one trapped underneath the craft.

Heritage Culturalist Training 2018 – Sign up now!

By | News | No Comments

Poudre Heritage Alliance Prepares for Third Straight Ambassador Training Program

The Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area (CALA) is announcing the third iteration of its Heritage Culturalist Program (HCP) – a robust volunteer training and educational program that highlights the importance of the Poudre River. This year’s training will take place over two and a half days from May 17-19. For the second straight year, the program is paid for in part by a State Historical Fund grant from History Colorado, the Colorado Historical Society.

Currently 29 people have gone through the Poudre Heritage Alliance’s (PHA) Heritage Culturalist program over the last two years. The HCP is free to sign up and participate, but spots are limited. The training features classroom and field learning sessions led by local historians, authors, and experts in the field of history and historic preservation. The training focuses on the history of the Poudre River and how western water law and settlement in northern Colorado was and continues to be shaped by the events related to the use of the river and its water. Interested individuals and organizations can go online to learn more and sign up: https://poudreheritage.org/heritage-culturalist-volunteers/ (Applications are due by April 30. 2018)

Judy Firestien, family owner of the Von Trotha-Firestien Historic Farm at Bracewell, who went through 2017 training, has this to say about the program: “The Heritage Area is so special to me because a portion of our farm lies within the Heritage Area and I have many fond childhood memories of times along the river, mostly exploring with my dog, Duke. I became a volunteer with CALA to further solidify the knowledge I have gained over the past years with regard to the history of the area, water history and water law, and historic preservation. I hope to further use this knowledge on our farm to educate the public on history, water, and how awesome PHA is and to inspire and encourage people to learn more!”

Following the training, the volunteers engage in self-guided learning through individual exploration of the CALA and group projects focused on one of the six historical sites that were visited during the training. The 2018 training will include site visits to the Eaton House in Windsor; the Lake Canal and Arthur’s Ditch in Fort Collins; the Greeley #2 Ditch and Diversion structure; and the Delph Carpenter House and White Plumb Farm in Greeley. (For a listing of the speakers at this year’s training, see attached.)

Community members in Larimer and Weld counties with a passion for learning and sharing the history of the Poudre River are encouraged to apply by going online: https://poudreheritage.org/heritage-culturalist-volunteers/. The dates for this year’s training will be the afternoon on Thursday May 17 through Saturday May 19.

For more information about the Heritage Culturalist Program please contact Jordan Williams at 970-295-4851 or programs@poudreheritage.org.

Speakers at 2018 training (in-progress):

  • Kathleen Benedict, PHA Executive Director
  • Bob Overbeck, City of Fort Collins Councilman, PHA Board Chairperson
  • Ron Sladek, President of Historic Larimer County and Tatanka Historical Associates
  • Peggy Ford Waldo, Greeley Museums Development Curator and Weld County Genealogical Society President
  • Margo Carlock, Executive Director, National Association for Interpretation
  • Justice Greg Hobbs, Associate Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court (retired), author, and Colorado water law expert
  • Robert Ward, College of Engineering CSU (professor emeritus), former PHA board member, and 2016 HCP volunteer
  • Tom Trout, Supervisory Agricultural Engineer, USDA (retired), 2016 HCP volunteer
  • Karen Scopel, City of Greeley Natural Resources Manager, PHA Board of Directors Treasurer
  • Wade Willis, Town of Windsor Manager of Parks and Open Space Division, PHA Board of Directors Vice Chairperson
  • Amy Unger, Historic Preservation Survey and Education Grants Coordinator, State Historical Fund
  • Cheryl Glanz, Publicity Chairperson, American Historical Society of Germans from Russia – Northern Colorado Chapter, 2016 Certified Heritage Culturalist Volunteer
  • Luke Bolinger and Kristen Sweet McFarling, Town of Windsor Recreation & Culture
  • Mark Taylor, Board President for Arthur Ditch management agency through the City of Fort Collins
  • Joanna Luth Stull, Greeley History Museum, Centennial Village Docent
  • Dan Perry, Manager of Greeley History Museum, 2017 Heritage Culturalist Volunteer, PHA Board Directors member (at-large)
  • Stephen Smith, Water Resources and Irrigation Engineering with Wade Water LLC

(Picture above of 2017 Heritage Culturalists at Great Western Sugar Beet Flume)

Fort Fund Awards Grant to Poudre Pour

By | News | No Comments

FORT COLLINS, Colo. – The first annual Poudre Pour has been awarded a $4,250 Fort Fund (City of Fort Collins) grant to support the event in 2018. The Poudre Heritage Alliance and BreWater are partnering to host the Poudre Pour, an educational celebration of “Good Water = Good Beer!” from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, at the Carnegie Center for Creativity, 200 Mathews St, in Fort Collins, Colorado.

The Poudre Pour will highlight water and the importance of the Cache la Poudre River to more than 634,000[i] Coloradoans living in Larimer and Weld Counties. The event focuses on craft brews and the major ingredient that makes the stouts, lagers and ales so tasty…WATER from the Poudre River!

This family-friendly event is not your typical brewfest! The Poudre Pour includes an afternoon of fun and learning with 11 craft beer tasting stations from brewers such as New Belgium, Horse & Dragon, Intersect, Soul Squared, Gilded Goat, Purpose, Odell, Coopersmiths, Maxline, Jessup Farm, and Rally King; appetizers such as Noosa yoghurts, Nanga chocolates, pretzels with beer-cheese dip and a S’more pit for kids; special presentations such as the trailer release of “The Power of Place” movie and a panel speaking about “A River of Many Uses”; kid activities such as “fishing” and t-shirt printing; live entertainment from Beth’s Studio; art exhibitions from local photographers and Windsor Charter Academy; and a silent auction featuring trips, treats, tickets and more!

Proceeds will benefit the Poudre Heritage Alliance, managing entity of the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area – working to PROMOTE a variety of historical and cultural opportunities, ENGAGE people in their river corridor and INSPIRE learning, preservation, and stewardship.

The event is enabled through the generous support of in-kind donations and sponsorships that make it possible to both celebrate and educate about our most important resource – water.

Poudre Pour sponsors to date include:  BreWater, City of Fort Collins Fort Fund, 105.5 The Colorado Sound, KUNC Radio, Beth Studio, Bohemian Foundation, Scene Magazine, Downtown Development Authority, JAX Mercantile, Shirazi Benefits, Clear Water Solutions, Von Trotha-Firestien Historic Farm, Encompass Technologies, Dellenbach Motors, The Windsor-Severance Historical Society, Sign-a-rama, Citizen Printing, Noosa Yoghurts, Nanga Chocolate and Rocky Mountain Soda Company.

The Poudre Heritage Alliance and community partners are joining to celebrate the wonder of water and protect our water heritage for this and future generations!

Tickets to the Poudre Pour are limited and MUST be purchased in advance: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/poudre-pour-tickets-39525190910

///

ABOUT THE CACHE LA POUDRE RIVER NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA AND THE POUDRE HERITAGE ALLIANCE

The Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area (CALA) tells the story of the river where Western Water Law began and still informs the use of water throughout the arid West today.  CALA shares the long struggle to sustain a viable agricultural economy, and meet the growing needs of a diverse and expanding population, while conserving the Poudre River’s health.

CALA’s 501(c)3 nonprofit managing entity – the Poudre Heritage Alliance – PROMOTES a variety of historical and cultural opportunities; ENGAGES people in their river corridor; and INSPIRES learning, preservation, and stewardship. Find out more at:  https://www.poudreheritage.org/

ABOUT BREWATER

BreWater brings together breweries in the greater Fort Collins area to discuss local water issues, to bring community members together, to encourage water education, and to protect the quality of our most important resource: water.

Find out more at: https://brewater.com/

[i] According to the US Census Bureau as of July 1, 2016 the population in Larimer County, CO totaled 339,993, and the population in Weld County totaled 294,932.

Poudre Heritage Alliance Hosts First-Ever Emeritus Dinner

By | News | No Comments

Poudre Heritage Alliance Hosts First-Ever Emeritus Dinner for the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area

The Poudre Heritage Alliance (PHA) hosted a special recognition event for past board members and regional influencers on March 1, 2018 at the Greeley Country Club. This first time gathering of local, regional, and national Poudre River advocates was held to acknowledge the hard work of four Emeritus honorees: Senator Hank Brown, Dr. Howard Alden (posthumous), Richard Brady, and Richard C. Maxfield.

Hank Brown – A Vietnam veteran, who served as a forward aircraft controller in the US Navy. He is a graduate from the University of Colorado. After graduation he worked for Monfort. In 1974 he was elected to the Colorado State Senate. In 1980 he was elected to Congress representing Colorado’s Fourth Congressional District. In 1986 he successfully sponsored legislation to make the Poudre River north of Fort Collins a Wild and Scenic River. In 1990, Hank was elected to the U.S. Senate. In 1996, his legislation to create the Poudre Heritage Area was enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton. Following his service in Congress, he returned to Colorado to become the Executive Director of the Daniels Foundation and serve as President of the University of Northern Colorado and the University of Colorado.

Dr. Howard Alden was a former Colorado State University professor, and a founding member of the Poudre River Trust and the Poudre Heritage Alliance. He was Director of the Environmental Learning Center from 1976-91 and co-founder/president of the Arapaho Roosevelt Pawnee Forest Foundation. He received many awards and accolades over the years, including the Gene Mitchell Award in 1995, the Larimer County Stewardship Award 1996, and worked as a Fulbright Scholar in New Zealand. Dr. Alden served on the original working committee and that helped with the Poudre River’s National Heritage Area designation. The 2011 CALA Guidebook is dedicated to Howard.

Richard Brady’s family ties to the Poudre River Valley go back several generations to when his grandparents first settled in the region. His public and community involvement can be felt throughout Northern Colorado. He was the City of Greeley’s attorney for many years before becoming a founding board member of PHA. He served as PHA’s Interim Executive Director and as the Board Chairperson for several years where he was instrumental in securing technical changes to the original River Corridor legislation. He retired from the PHA board in December 2016, but he is still active as a volunteer for the organization.

Richard C. Maxfield is a fourth generation Coloradoan from Fort Collins and has lived in Greeley since 1961. He is a past director of the Poudre Heritage Alliance where he served as the Chairman and Vice Chair over many years. He was involved in several other community organizations during that time such as the Greeley Chamber of Commerce, Jubilee Ministries of Episcopal Diocese of Colorado, and the Vestry of Trinity Episcopal Church. He is a Paul Harris and W.D. Farr Fellow and past board member in the Rotary Club of Greeley. He is still president of Maxfield Services Corporation, which continues to be recognized for its contribution to service enriched affordable housing.

These four individuals contributed greatly to the formation of the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area (CALA), making it the first if its kind west of the Mississippi River 22 years ago in 1996. Several of them also spent years helping PHA manage this unique national designation. The event program for the Emeritus Dinner consisted of introductions by colleagues and friends, with special awards being given to each of the four honorees. The presentations and speeches were recorded for historical archiving purposes.

Several Larimer and Weld County managers, Greeley and Fort Collins municipal leaders, and Colorado State University and University of Northern Colorado faculty attended the dinner. Local leaders in attendance included Maria Secrest, District Representative for Senator Cory Gardner, National Park liaison Larry Gamble (retired), and Intermountain Regional Director of National Heritage Areas, Alexandra Hernandez. The emcee for the evening was Fort Collins City Councilman and current PHA Board Chairman, Bob Overbeck. For the full list of PHA’s 2018 Board of Directors, visit CALA’s website.

For more pictures of the event, or for more information about PHA or CALA, please contact the Poudre Heritage Alliance Office at admin@poudreheritage.org or 970-295-4851.

 

Pictured left to right above: Emeritus honorees Richard Brady, Richard C. Maxfield, Senator Hank Brown, and Susan Alden (accepted award on Howard’s behalf) *Photo Credit: Hailey Groo

Your Water Colorado Blog – 2/12/2018

By | News | No Comments

Water law in Colorado is constantly developing. Check out this new blog post from Your Water Colorado:

Public Access to Water Flowing Through Private Property

“A Denver Post article written by Jason Blevins resurrects a water issue left unresolved in Colorado for nearly 40 years. “Who owns the bottom of the river?” asks a lawsuit brought by a fisherman, Roger Hill, against a landowner, Mark Warsewa, who has blocked Hill’s access to fish on a portion of the Arkansas River near Texas Creek in Fremont County. Warsewa owns the land adjacent to the river and Hill likes to wade there after entering from public property. Warsewa claims his land ownership includes the stream bed; Hill contends the river bottom is public property. A federal district court has been asked to decide.

The basis for the suit is a body of federal law called “navigability for title,” which essentially says that if a river was used for commercial purposes at the time of statehood (Aug. 1, 1876 for Colorado), then the state owns the bed and the public has access to use the river for recreational purposes. The case—Roger Hill v. Mark Everett Warsewa and Linda Joseph—is in the U.S. District Court for Colorado because, as the plaintiff’s complaint asserts, “the question of whether the Arkansas River was navigable for title at the time of Colorado’s statehood is a question of federal law.”

Colorado has no state law defining navigability. A 1979 Colorado Supreme Court decision—People v. Emmert—ruled that a Colorado constitutional provision declaring the waters of every natural stream to be public property subject to appropriation did not grant public access for recreational use when the water flowed through private property. Violators are subject to criminal trespass. A state attorney general’s opinion four years later said that rafters would not be criminally liable, but could be subject to civil trespass. A 2010 legislative attempt to clarify the law would have allowed commercial rafters to float on waters through private property, but not fish; it passed the House but failed in the Senate.

Hill points to newspaper accounts from the 1870s that describe commercial use of the Arkansas River near Texas Creek to float logs and railroad ties. His complaint claims the river “was navigable at the time of statehood because it was regularly used and was susceptible to being used in its ordinary condition at the time of statehood as a highway for commerce, over which trade and travel are or may be conducted.” These are the essential components of the federal “navigability for title” law.”

For the full article by Larry Morandi, click here.

Photo: “Colorado River @ Bond Colorado” by Loco Steve is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Poudre Heritage Alliance Now Accepting 2018 Grant Applications

By | News | No Comments

The Poudre Heritage Alliance (PHA) and the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area (CALA) are now accepting 2018 grant applications. Other non-profits, government entities, and small businesses can go online to submit their applications: https://poudreheritage.org/grant-information/. The closing date for applications is March 2, 2018, with award decisions by May 2018. See below for more information about grant projects from 2017:

Historic Windmill Installation: Centennial Village Museum, established as a Centennial-Bicentennial community project in 1976 adjacent to Island Grove Regional Park in Greeley, CO, was designed as a living history site to interpret the architectural and cultural heritage of Greeley, Weld County and northeastern Colorado, The Historic Windmill project would repair and re-install a Steel Eclipse Type WG (worm gear) Fairbanks-Morse and Company windmill that includes a stock tank with a recirculating water system in the High Plains section of the Village. The windmill interprets the delivery of water for domestic use, stock raising, and irrigating crops in the rural irrigated and dryland districts of Weld County. An interpretive panel adjacent to the windmill plus curriculum materials for presentations at the annual spring and fall History festivals at the Village will be developed as a part of this project.

Proving-up House Restoration: Saved from demolition in 2005, the City of Fort Collins moved the historic 1890 James Ross “proving-up” house to storage until an appropriate permanent placement for educational purposes could be found. The only documented proving-up house known to exist in Larimer County, the Ross House has survived for 127 years. The Homestead Act of 1862 was adopted to get vast government lands west of the Mississippi into private hands for settlement and development. The Act mandated homesteaders had to build a small dwelling, live in it, improve the land, and after five years, for an $18 filing fee, they owned that quarter section of land. These houses, sometimes called “claim or filing shanties” often had no foundation and were portable, to be able to “prove-up” other holdings. Last fall, the Ross House was relocated to The Farm at Lee Martinez Park along the Cache la Poudre River in Fort Collins, where it will be restored and interpreted for the enjoyment and education of all citizens.

Nature Rides Program: The Growing Project (TGP) developed a new, educational program that connects youth from The Boys and Girls Club to natural areas in Northwest Fort Collins for activities related to the watershed and local ecology with Growing Project educators and experts. TGP worked with Bike Fort Collins and the Bike Co-op to secure bikes and bicycle education for youth participants to ride from their facilities to the natural areas with TGP staff. Part of programming included occasional service days through a partnership with The City of Fort Collins that involved cleanup efforts in local natural areas and while learning about river health from City experts. Youth were also able to invite family members on these rides.

H20 Today Exhibition: “H2O Today” at the Greeley History Museum dives into what it means to live on a planet where 71 percent of the surface is covered in water, yet less than 3 percent is drinkable. The exhibition highlights the crucial role it plays in daily life through water power, industry, agriculture and home use. The “H2O Today” exhibition is part of the Smithsonian’s Think Water Initiative to raise awareness of water as a critical resource for life through exhibitions, educational resources and public programs. The exhibit runs through May 20, 2018.

***Picture above taken by the Growing Project staff during a Nature Rides program along the Poudre River

CALA and its partners give Northern Colorado Economy $81.6 million boost

By | News | No Comments

The Poudre Heritage Alliance (PHA) commissioned a study in Spring 2017 that would analyze the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area’s (CALA) economic impact on Larimer and Weld Counties. The results were very impressive, with the Heritage Area accounting for an annual economic boost of $81.6 million, supporting 1,067 jobs, and generating $6.9 million in tax revenues.

Tripp Umbach, who did the 2017 assessment of CALA based on data from 2014-2016, has completed comprehensive economic impact studies for 15 NHA sites across the U.S. CALA’s four main economic drivers include tourism surrounding the river itself, operations of PHA and its partner organizations, grant-making efforts, and capital projects. The top economic impact sectors were hotels/motels, full-service restaurants, limited-service restaurants, and other amusement/recreation industries. Click here to view the full economic impact study.

While many people understand the importance of the Poudre River to the Northern Colorado region, it’s the Poudre Heritage Alliance’s job to stress the significance of why this natural and cultural resource is designated as one of only 49 National Heritage Areas in the United States. The Poudre Heritage Alliance as a 501(c)3 nonprofit accomplishes this goal by promoting a variety of historical and cultural opportunities, engaging people in their river corridor and inspiring continued learning, preservation, and stewardship

However, PHA and CALA are under threat from demands on water, insufficient federal appropriations, the need to raise awareness about water management, rising human health and safety concerns, a generation more connected to their technology than to the natural world, and the loss of history and heritage over time.

As the giving season approaches, please consider the Poudre Heritage Alliance and the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area as a worthy charitable cause. You can schedule your Colorado Gives donation here. Donations must be scheduled before Tuesday December 5th to qualify for the Community Foundation’s matching program.

More about CALA and PHA: The Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area is one of 49 National Heritage Areas (NHA) in the United States. NHAs are places where natural, cultural, historic, and scenic resources combine to form a cohesive, nationally distinctive landscape arising from patterns of human activity shaped by geography. CALA stretches 45 miles along the curves and bends of the hard-working Poudre River from the eastern border of the rugged Roosevelt National Forest, down through the blossoming cities of Fort Collins, Windsor, and Greeley, until the vital water resource conjoins with the South Platte River in the Colorado eastern plains.

As the managing organization behind CALA, the Poudre Heritage Alliance serves the local communities of Larimer and Weld County by building a deeper understanding of the Poudre River’s national significance as it relates to water law and water management. PHA and CALA bring together residents, private organizations, and government entities behind this common goal, while also enticing tourists with the recreational, environmental, and historical points of interest throughout the Heritage Area. PHA programs and initiatives that support these efforts include volunteer trainings, grant-funded projects, and outreach events that help educate people about water history and the importance of the Poudre River corridor today.

For more information about PHA or CALA, please contact the Poudre Heritage Alliance Office at admin@poudreheritage.org or 970-295-4851.

The Poudre Heritage Alliance Joins the Global #GivingTuesday Movement!

By | News | No Comments

The Poudre Heritage Alliance for the Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area has joined #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving that harnesses the collective power of individuals, communities and organizations to encourage philanthropy and to celebrate generosity worldwide. Occurring this year on November 28, #GivingTuesday is held annually on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving (in the US) and the widely recognized shopping events Black Friday and Cyber Monday to kick off the holiday giving season and inspire people to collaborate in improving their local communities and to give back in impactful ways to the charities and causes they support.

On Giving Tuesday beginning at 6:00am MST, Facebook will be waiving all fees for donations made through Facebook , and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will match up to $2M in donations.

The stakes for PHA and the CALA are high. The PHA and CALA are under threat from increasing demands on water, shrinking federal appropriations, the need to raise awareness about water management, rising human health and safety concerns, a generation more connected to their technology than to the natural world, and the loss of history and heritage over time.

Your gift will make a difference right now and well into the future. Together we can PROMOTE a variety of historical and cultural opportunities, ENGAGE people in their river corridor and INSPIRE learning, preservation, and stewardship

92Y − a cultural center in New York City that, since 1874, has been bringing people together around its core values of community service and giving back − conceptualized #GivingTuesday as a new way of linking individuals and causes to strengthen communities and encourage giving. In 2016, the fifth year of #GivingTuesday, millions of people in 98 countries came together to give back and support the causes they believe in. Over $177 million was raised online to benefit a tremendously broad range of organizations, and much more was given in volunteer hours, donations of food and clothing, and acts of kindness. “We have been incredibly inspired by the generosity in time, efforts and ideas that have brought our concept for a worldwide movement into reality,” said Henry Timms, founder of #GivingTuesday and executive director of 92Y. “As we embark on our sixth year of #GivingTuesday, we are encouraged by the early response from partners eager to continue making an impact in this global conversation.”

Those who are interested in joining Poudre Heritage Alliance’s #GivingTuesday initiative can visit Cache la Poudre River National Heritage Area’s Facebook page to donate or set up their own fundraiser for #GivingTuesday! Click here to donate today!

Poudre Heritage Alliance and CSU Celebrate Native American History Month in November

By | News | No Comments

November is Native American Month, and there will be a variety of events taking place on CSU’s campus hosted by the Native American Cultural Center and many other organizations.

In the meantime, be sure to check out PHA’s video archive and Northern Arapaho Video series release. (Featured picture showcases representatives from the City of Fort Collins, the Poudre Heritage Alliance, and tribal elders for the Northern Arapaho at a sign unveiling in Arapaho Bend Natural Area.)

Events

Wednesday, Nov. 1

Indigenous Speaker Series Presents: Cherokee Nation v. Nash — A Case of Treaty Interpretation and Tribal Self-Determination

Guest Speaker: Ron Hall,  5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Morgan Library Great Hall. 

Ron Hall is the president of Bubar & Hall Consulting, LLC, a consulting firm that supports tribal self-determination and engagement. Hall will engage in a conversation around Native law and policy, specifically related to the recent federal court decision between the Cherokee Nation and the Cherokee Freedmen.

Thursday, Nov. 2

Pow Wow 101, 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. in Eddy Hall room 100.

Pow Wow is a wonderful way to remember and celebrate heritage, culture and traditions among Native Americans. Join local resident Jan Iron, who will explain the basics of Pow Wow, including an overview of the day’s events and celebration.

Friday, Nov. 3

Fry Bread Sale, Drum Group and Pow Wow Dance Expo, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the LSC Sutherland Garden, (west side of the Lory Student Center), Colorado State University.

To celebrate Native American Heritage Month and the 35th Annual AISES Pow Wow, drum groups and dancers will provide performances. Fry bread will also be sold at this event.

Saturday, Nov. 4

Colorado State University’s 35th Annual AISES Pow Wow.

Gourd Dance — 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

  • Pow Wow 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Grand Entry 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.
  • Pow Wow Feed 5 p.m.

Host Northern Drum: Young Bear; Host Southern Drum: Southern Style. Lory Student Center Grand Ballrooms at CSU.

In an effort to increase awareness of Native cultures at CSU, the Native American Cultural Center, American Indian Science and Engineering Society, Associated Students of Colorado State University and Colorado State University will sponsor the 35th Annual CSU Pow Wow. Community members and student alike are welcome and encouraged to attend this free event, which will feature Pow Wow dancers, drum groups, food, vendors, social events and more.

Tuesday, Nov. 7

Duhesa Art Gallery Reception, Aasgutú ádi (Forest Creatures). Featuring comments from the artists Crystal Worl and Jennifer Younger.

4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Lory Student Center Duhesa Gallery.

The title of this exhibit is in the Tlingit language. The exhibit encompasses the natural beings represented in the various artworks of this exhibition, but also refers to the Tlingit people. Utilizing their experience in various art materials, Crystal Worl, Jennifer Youner and Alison Marks encourage the viewer to look at traditional art forms through different lenses. The culmination of their artwork demonstrates the subsistence on Tlingit culture into the work of contemporary artists.

Gallery walkthrough at 5:15 p.m.

Wednesday, Nov. 8, Thursday, Nov. 9

Aspen Grille – Featured Traditional Native American Dishes.

Do you enjoy corn, sunflower seeds, potatoes, squash and pumpkins? How about tomatoes, strawberries and chile peppers? They are all native to the Americas and have been part of the diet of Native Americans since time immemorial. Make your reservations at the LSC Aspen Grille to enjoy lunch specials prepared by Chef Ken Sysmsack that recognize these gifts to today’s cuisine.

For reservations call 970-491-7006

Thursday, Nov. 9

Open House Hosted by NACC North Star Peer Mentors

5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Native American Cultural Center, Lory Student Center Room 327

Come meet the 2017-2018 North Star Peer Mentors while enjoying board games, a movie, and hot chocolate and apple cider. North Start Peer Mentor Program is a program of the Native American Cultural Center that matches incoming students with current students to guide the transitions to Colorado State University.

Monday, Nov. 13

Keynote Event: AWAKE: A Dream from Standing Rock documentary featuring Filmmakers: Floris White Bull & Doug Good Feather

Film begins at 6 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Lory Student Center Theatre.

AWAKE follows the dramatic rise of the historic #NoDAPL Native-led peaceful resistance at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Thousands of activists converged from around the country to stand in solidarity with the water protectors protesting the construction of the $3.7 billion Dakota Access Pipeline. There will be a screening of the documentary, followed by a conversation with some filmmakers.

Tuesday, Nov. 14

Harvest Dinner, Community Event

6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Location: To be announced

Ron Hall and Roe Bubar, owners of Arikara Farm, worked the farm this year to engage students, family and the community to support our farm as we grew traditional food and heritage turkey to bring about the harvest for our Community Dinner. Come join in the “Indigenous Food Revolution” to learn how the earth is our teacher and food is our medicine. Arikara Farm and NACC are pleased to support this Indigenous Community Dinner.

For more information please visit www.nacc.colostate.edu or call 970-491-1332.

See the link to the original article here.